likkōn


likkōn
*likkōn
germ., schwach. Verb:
nhd. lecken ( Verb) (1);
ne. lick (Verb);
Rekontruktionsbasis: ae.,-anfrk., as., ahd.;
Etymologie:
s. ing. *leig̑ʰ-, *sleig̑ʰ-, Verb, lecken (Verb) (1), Pokorny 668;
Weiterleben:
ae. lic-c-ian, schwach. Verb (2), lecken (Verb) (1);
Weiterleben:
anfrk. lek-k-on* 1, lec-k-on*, schwach. Verb (2), lecken (Verb) (1);
Weiterleben:
as. lik-k-on* 1, schwach. Verb (2), lecken (Verb) (1);
mnd. licken, lecken, schwach. Verb, lecken (Verb) (1), ablecken;
Weiterleben:
ahd. lekkōn* 10, leckōn*, schwach. Verb (2), lecken (Verb) (1), belecken;
s. mhd. lëcken, schwach. Verb, lecken (Verb) (1), belecken, duften;
nhd. lecken, schwach. Verb, lecken (Verb) (1), DW 12, 477;
Literatur: Falk\/Torp 367, Kluge s. u. lecken

Germanisches Wörterbuch . 2014.

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